Keynotes & Workshops

Friday, January 4th

Keynote 8:15 A.M. – 9:15 A.M.

Livin’ The Dream!

Full of big dreams and a blissfully naïve picture of what farming would be, I committed myself to a handful of CSA members 14 years ago and began my education on the hard and incredible realities of farm life. Now with my husband joining the journey, we have learned so much along the way. The most valuable lesson learned thus far is that our dreams are attainable not in spite of the bumps along the road, but because of them!

Laura Bledsoe

Keynote 9:15 A.M. – 10:10 A.M.

Grain by Grain: Rebuilding Rural America Through Sustainable Agriculture

Town Hall 10:20 A.M. – 11:10 A.M.

Town Hall

This will be no ordinary Town Hall meeting! 
Joel Salatin will be leading with Sally Fallon MorellJed JohnsonPete Kennedy, and Utah representatives in what promises to be a robust discussion with those in Utah and across the country who have been at the forefront of the local direct-to-consumer food movement.

Keynote 11:15 A.M. – 12:05 P.M.

Regenerative Agriculture: Healthy Soils, No-Till Agriculture, and the Future of Farming

Keynote 1:30 P.M. – 3:00 P.M.

Can We Feed the World?

This is hands down the most frequently asked question to Joel or anyone else who promotes localized, solar-driven, carbon-fertilized systems. Even most foodies and environmentalists have a deep-seated assumption that were it not for the petroleum-based fertilizer boom–the green revolution–we could not feed ourselves. Those massive Kansas wheat field and California almond groves, for most people, represent efficiency and abundance. Nothing could be further from the truth. Backyard gardens and multi-speciation are far more productive per acre. Modern scientific aerobic composting was not invented until 1943–about the same time as chemical fertilizer became widely used. In this keynote, Joel will give you the tools to articulate a credible “feed the world” debate.

Joel Salatin

Keynote 1:30 P.M. – 3:00 P.M.

Can We Feed the World?

This is hands down the most frequently asked question to Joel or anyone else who promotes localized, solar-driven, carbon-fertilized systems. Even most foodies and environmentalists have a deep-seated assumption that were it not for the petroleum-based fertilizer boom–the green revolution–we could not feed ourselves. Those massive Kansas wheat field and California almond groves, for most people, represent efficiency and abundance. Nothing could be further from the truth. Backyard gardens and multi-speciation are far more productive per acre. Modern scientific aerobic composting was not invented until 1943–about the same time as chemical fertilizer became widely used. In this keynote, Joel will give you the tools to articulate a credible “feed the world” debate.

Joel Salatin

Workshops 3:15 P.M. – 5:45 P.M.

The Down and Dirty, Nitty Gritty Details of Livin’ Life on the Farm

This workshop is going to be informative and fun. We have some ideas to share, some projects to build, some snacks to munch, seeds to swap and stories to tell. We have learned some amazing lessons along the way of building this farm; some hard, some miraculous, all useful and instructive. Can’t wait to share it all with you!

Laura & Monte Bledsoe

Carbon Farming for Profit

Ancient Grains: How to Grow Them, How to Cook Them, and Emerging Research on Nutrition

Don’t Be Scared; Be Strange

What stops you from profitability and success? Fear of enough help, of land, of
business requirements, of marketing, of knowledge—these are the things that stop us. Goodness,
farmers often even fear success because then we might look selfish instead of
slaving to feed the world. This workshop dares to articulate these real fears and then
offers solutions to each one. Tears and laughter mingle for breakthroughs you may
never have imagined.

Joel Salatin

Friday, January 4th

Keynote 1:30 P.M. – 3:00 P.M.

Exploring the Farming Impulse and What “It” is for You

Answers from Experts 9:50 A.M. – 10:50 A.M.

How do I get a bill passed or change a law? Can I raise and sell chicken, elk, bison rabbit? What can I, and what can’t I do? One-on-one, ask your questions, get help and answers from experts on the forefront of food sovereignty who have passed landmark bills: Utah legislature, an attorney and or an analyst / consultant.

Pete KennedyPaula Milby, & Marc Roberts

Workshops 10:00 A.M. – 11:00 A.M.

Cooperative Food Systems – A Case Study

Our economic and financial systems are a pyramid scheme, our people and communities are afflicted by a deep cultural malaise, and our children likely face a difficult future. We clearly need new stories to guide us in a confusing and rapidly changing world. This workshop will use Our Table Cooperative as a case-study for an alternative political and cultural economy centered around cooperative food systems. We will discuss the structural flaws of neoliberal corporate capitalism and its impacts on the contemporary food system, and examine place-based alternatives based on a model multi-stakeholder cooperative that allows local communities to come together and take charge of their food and health.
Narendra Varma

Regenerative Ranchers Intensively Grazing (Part 1 of 2)

Oh sure, Joel Salatin can do it where pasture is waist high and rain falls from the sky but what about here? “We will discuss the principles, the in’s and out’s, and benefits of managed grazing for the soil/land, animals, and quality of life and how it’s worked for us here in the 2 driest states in the west. With experience to share from grazing on BLM permits to irrigated pastures and from small acreages with a few animals to vast acreages with hundreds of animals.”

Tyler WesthoffSteve WesthoffJared Sorensen, & Matt Palmer

Nourishing Traditional Diets: The Key to Vibrant Health (Part 1 of 3)

Animal fats, properly prepared whole grains, enzyme-enriched foods and nourishing bone broths kept our ancestors healthy. Sally Fallon Morell, author of Nourishing Traditions, explains why you need these foods too. Beginning with a presentation of Dr. Weston Price’s unforgettable photographs of healthy traditional peoples, Sally explains the underlying factors in a variety of traditional diets that conferred beauty, strength and complete freedom from disease on so-called primitive populations. Then she presents suggestions for implementing a nourishing traditional diet, even if you don’t like to cook!

Learn about

  • Butter, the number one health food
  • Vital role of high cholesterol foods
  • Dangers of modern soy foods and soy infant formula
  • The dangers of vegetable oils and hydrogenated fats
  • Foods that help babies grow up smart and strong
  • Old fashioned foods that give limitless energy and vibrant health
  • The unfortunate consequences of modern farming methods
  • How to implement the principles of nutrient-dense nutrition in your diet

Sally Fallon

Georgics: The Greek and Roman Tradition of Farming

There is something politically and morally stabilizing about farming. The very foundations of the Western World were built on the character qualities of independent citizen-farmers. It was Cato the Elder who said in 200 BC that the old Romans praised a man by calling him a “good farmer” and that farming was the “most highly respected calling.” Seeking to build a great nation on the foundations of morality, justice, and political stability, the American founders, in an effort to emulate the best of the ancients, saw the value of farming combined with deep critical thinking—this is called Georgics. They even called themselves the “New Romans.”

Shannon Brooks

Question and Answer: Making a No-Till Ecological System Work for You

Workshops 11:15 A.M. – 12:15 P.M.

Permaculture and Monticello College: Where the Rubber Meets the Road

Some colleges may teach permaculture, but what would happen if permaculture taught the college, or in other words, a college, it’s programs, curriculum, buildings, campus and so forth were designed using the permaculture design process? Monticello College restores classical liberal arts education with a large added twist, a permaculture microcosm where students (and faculty) live, study, grow food, design productive gardens, restore degenerated soil and landscapes, participate in construction projects and start businesses. Join us as were explore permaculture design through the lens of Monticello College and it’s Living Campus. A discussion on liberty, independence, georgics, community, economics, entrepreneurship, higher education and the growing of food.

Josh Choate

Regenerative Ranchers Intensively Grazing (Part 2 of 2)

Oh sure, Joel Salatin can do it where pasture is waist high and rain falls from the sky but what about here? “We will discuss the principles, the in’s and out’s, and benefits of managed grazing for the soil/land, animals, and quality of life and how it’s worked for us here in the 2 driest states in the west. With experience to share from grazing on BLM permits to irrigated pastures and from small acreages with a few animals to vast acreages with hundreds of animals.”

Tyler WesthoffSteve WesthoffJared Sorensen, & Matt Palmer

Nourishing Traditional Diets: The Key to Vibrant Health (Part 2 of 3)

Animal fats, properly prepared whole grains, enzyme-enriched foods and nourishing bone broths kept our ancestors healthy. Sally Fallon Morell, author of Nourishing Traditions, explains why you need these foods too. Beginning with a presentation of Dr. Weston Price’s unforgettable photographs of healthy traditional peoples, Sally explains the underlying factors in a variety of traditional diets that conferred beauty, strength and complete freedom from disease on so-called primitive populations. Then she presents suggestions for implementing a nourishing traditional diet, even if you don’t like to cook!

Learn about

  • Butter, the number one health food
  • Vital role of high cholesterol foods
  • Dangers of modern soy foods and soy infant formula
  • The dangers of vegetable oils and hydrogenated fats
  • Foods that help babies grow up smart and strong
  • Old fashioned foods that give limitless energy and vibrant health
  • The unfortunate consequences of modern farming methods
  • How to implement the principles of nutrient-dense nutrition in your diet

Sally Fallon

Legacy Land Stewardship: Biodynamics and Beyond – an Agro-Homeopathy (Part 1 of 2)

How do we build a land legacy we can be proud of? How can we collaborate with Creation to regenerate fertility for now and coming generations?

We will ask the hard questions about what kind of legacy we are currently leaving. Then, together explore how we might build a worthy inheritance, a living regenerative system to pass on to future generations. What are the physical/horizontal ethics and practices that lay the foundation for the spiritual/ vertical intentions that build whole farm vitality? How do we, as Wes Jackson has proposed, “become native to our places?” What do we need to do in our daily and long-term stewardship to rebuild our relationship to the land and all the life in it, to leave a good trail?

Through stories of stewardship trials, 3rd party scientific laboratory data and necessary shifts in thinking we will share what we have tried on and in the ground to re-establishing our relationships to the land.

Bring your stories so we can all learn how to move ahead, to preserve the generational legacy we have been blessed with.

Lloyd Nelson & Brook LeVan

The Language of Farming

Join me in a discussion of my journey with Petersen Family Farms and how it has taught me to speak the language of farming and build a farm in the middle of town with a foundation that will endure the storms. I will talk about how our farm became a million dollar business and I will share with you secrets of success in today’s agricultural landscape.

Luke Petersen

Workshops 1:45 P.M. – 2:45 P.M.

The Boulder Skills Foundation, Inspiring Resiliency in Boulder, Utah (Panel Discussion)

Boulder, Utah is a small, vibrant, rural town (population 180) nestled in the center of wild nature. Historically we have been shaped by the limitations inherent in living remotely, and to this day a sense of resiliency defines all who live here. Nine years ago, inspired by the Transition Town movement, several members of the Boulder community created the Boulder Skills Foundation devoted to maintaining, teaching and acquiring the skills necessary for a resilient and thriving town. 
In this panel discussion you will meet members involved in the annual Harvest Festival, seed collective, fibershed, Utah Water Guardians, community market, tool share and soil health; as well as young gardeners and business owners who have chosen to make Boulder home. We hope to inspire those who attend this discussion and will open the conversation to the audience to provide guidance on how to organize similar initiatives in your own community.

Haylee AppersonBrynn BrodieScott BrodieJosh EllisMatt CochranEric FeilerConstance LynnJane Phillips, & Nicole Tomlin

Converting to Organic and Taking an Ancient Wheat to Market

This workshop will review the path of converting a 3 generation 2400 acre wheat and cattle ranch in North Central Montana to a regenerative organic operation over the past 35 years – what worked – what did not – what we are still learning and our current challenges. It will also detail the process by which an ancient wheat was taken from a handful of grain considered nothing more than a novelty to a world market of over 3500 products sold under the Kamut brand – from ½ acre planted on Quinn’s farm in 1986 to 100,000 acres contracted with over 250 organic farmers in Montana, Alberta and Saskatchewan in 2017 the to current frustration of glyphosate contamination from rain falling on organic farms.

Bob Quinn

Nourishing Traditional Diets: The Key to Vibrant Health (Part 3 of 3)

Animal fats, properly prepared whole grains, enzyme-enriched foods and nourishing bone broths kept our ancestors healthy. Sally Fallon Morell, author of Nourishing Traditions, explains why you need these foods too. Beginning with a presentation of Dr. Weston Price’s unforgettable photographs of healthy traditional peoples, Sally explains the underlying factors in a variety of traditional diets that conferred beauty, strength and complete freedom from disease on so-called primitive populations. Then she presents suggestions for implementing a nourishing traditional diet, even if you don’t like to cook!

Learn about

  • Butter, the number one health food
  • Vital role of high cholesterol foods
  • Dangers of modern soy foods and soy infant formula
  • The dangers of vegetable oils and hydrogenated fats
  • Foods that help babies grow up smart and strong
  • Old fashioned foods that give limitless energy and vibrant health
  • The unfortunate consequences of modern farming methods
  • How to implement the principles of nutrient-dense nutrition in your diet

Sally Fallon

Legacy Land Stewardship: Biodynamics and Beyond – an Agro-Homeopathy (Part 2 of 2)

How do we build a land legacy we can be proud of? How can we collaborate with Creation to regenerate fertility for now and coming generations?

We will ask the hard questions about what kind of legacy we are currently leaving. Then, together explore how we might build a worthy inheritance, a living regenerative system to pass on to future generations. What are the physical/horizontal ethics and practices that lay the foundation for the spiritual/ vertical intentions that build whole farm vitality? How do we, as Wes Jackson has proposed, “become native to our places?” What do we need to do in our daily and long-term stewardship to rebuild our relationship to the land and all the life in it, to leave a good trail?

Through stories of stewardship trials, 3rd party scientific laboratory data and necessary shifts in thinking we will share what we have tried on and in the ground to re-establishing our relationships to the land.

Bring your stories so we can all learn how to move ahead, to preserve the generational legacy we have been blessed with.

Lloyd Nelson & Brook LeVan

Hungry for Change: Building a Local Food System for All

How many Utahns struggle to put enough food on the table, and what can we do to eliminate hunger while supporting small farmers and strengthening local food economies? During this session the presenters will provide an overview of food insecurity in Utah and will explore a range of innovative strategies for building more equitable and sustainable local food systems.

Alison Einerson & Brian Emerson

Answers from Experts 2:00 P.M. – 3:00 P.M.

How do I get a bill passed or change a law? Can I raise and sell chicken, elk, bison rabbit? What can I, and what can’t I do? One-on-one, ask your questions, get help and answers from experts on the forefront of food sovereignty who have passed landmark bills: Utah legislature, an attorney and or an analyst / consultant.

Pete KennedyPaula Milby, & Marc Roberts

Keynote 3:00 P.M. – 4:00 P.M.

Beyond Hope

Beyond “hope”, since I feel “hope” is too often used as an excuse to sit on one’s backside and do nothing, and instead, be very realistic about the challenges facing us and discuss concrete action at the community scale that I am inspired to in the hope of encouraging others to take action in their communities. I want to encourage people to put aside the despair that comes with knowledge of big daunting problems and instead, focus on their individual communities in an honest and open way.

Narendra Varma

Close Menu